Building the Teacher’s Library

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Teaching genealogy is often a labor of love. An excited genealogy buff emerges in a community and creates from the whole cloth what she or he thinks out to fit in a curriculum. A few inquitive people seek out what has already been written on the topic of genealogy education. These people would benefit from a closer look at some of the following titles:

  • Carlberg, Nancy Ellen. Teaching Genealogy. Anaheim, Calif.: Carlberg Press, 1988.
  • Carter, Fran. On Teaching Genealogy. Orting, Wash.: Heritage Quest Press, 1989.
  • Davis, John Rivard. Not Merely Ancestors: A Guide for Teaching Genealogy in the Schools. Baltimore, Md.: Clearfield Co., 1993.
  • Estus, Charles, et al. Creating Effective Community History Assignments. Chicago: Newberry Library, 1979. (Newberry Papers in Family and Community History, no. 79-4.)
  • Flack, Jerry D. Lives of Promise: Studies in Biography and Family History. Englewood, Colo.: Teacher Ideas Press, 1992. (Gifted Treasury Series.)
  • Parker, J. Carlyle. Directory of Archivist and Librarian Genealogical Instructors. Turlock, Calif.: Marietta Publishing Co., 1990.
  • Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr., and Provenzo, Asterie Baker. Pursuing the Past: Teacher’s Handbook. 2 v. Menlo Park, Calif.: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1984.
  • Smith, Gary, and Otero, George. Teaching About Ethnic Heritage. Rev. ed. Revised by Edith King. Denver, Colo.: Center for Teaching International Relations, University of Denver, 1988.
  • Styx, Sherrie A. Curioser and Curioser: Investigative Genealogy (Teacher Guide). Rev. 1989. Eugene, Oreg.: Styx Enterprises, 1989.
  • Teaching Community History: Guides to Readings in Colonial Studies, Family History, Multimedia, & Oral History. Chicago: Newberry Library, 1977. (Newberry Papers in Family and Community History, no. 77-1.)
  • Wynne, Frances Holloway, and Stevens, C. J. Teaching Genealogy to Enrich the Curricula of the Intermediate, Middle, or Junior High School. Baton Rouge, La.: Oracle Press, 1982.

I would be interested in hearing your opinions on any of these books. Are there some others you’d recommend? Which are suited for those teaching elementary, middle or high school classes, and which are appropriate for those teaching adult education? Your comments are most welcome.

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7 responses to “Building the Teacher’s Library

  1. Hi Ken,
    I am working on a course in teaching Genealogy on the Internet for the Everett Library system so I just printed your list of books thinking they may be helpful.
    Yes I will come back to your blog to see what’s happening. Keep up the good work.
    Donna

  2. Thank you for such a great and needed site. I look forward to working my way through this list of books…its and area I have found pretty bare. However, are there any books that are less than 20-odd years old?

    PS I managed to score 2 of the Fran Carter books, so if anyone is interested let me know.

  3. I just entered each of these books in Amazon. It remains quite hard to find any (let alone good) books on this subject, though there is more chance of finding a book for students rather than adults.

    OUT OF PRINT
    Carlberg, Nancy Ellen. Teaching Genealogy
    Davis, John Rivard. Not Merely Ancestors: A Guide for Teaching Genealogy in the Schools

    Available at Amazon
    Flack, Jerry D. Lives of Promise: Studies in Biography and Family History
    Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr., and Provenzo, Asterie Baker. Pursuing the Past: Teacher’s Handbook
    Smith, Gary, and Otero, George. Teaching About Ethnic
    Styx, Sherrie A. Curioser and Curioser: Investigative Genealogy (Teacher Guide
    Wynne, Frances Holloway, and Stevens, C. J. Teaching Genealogy to Enrich the Curricula of the Intermediate, Middle, or Junior High School (NOTE: $121 !!)

    Will try to find at Newberry
    Teaching Community History: Guides to Readings in Colonial Studies, Family History, Multimedia, & Oral History
    Estus, Charles, et al. Creating Effective Community History Assignments

  4. I have found these titles…anyone know if they are good (my interest is in adult education, not school)

    Not Merely Ancestors: A Guide for Teaching Genealogy in the Schools by John R. Davis

    Branch to branch: A manual for teachers of genealogy by Annette Lutnesky Perry

    Genealogy workbook: A guide for student and teacher by Helen L King

    Introducing genealogy: A workbook approach (Publication / Center for the Study of History) by Stuart Sprague

    Genealogy workbook by Diane Dieterle

    My History is America’s History: 15 Things You Can Do to Save America’s Stories by S/N 036-000-00069-4

    Teaching Genealogy by Nancy E. Carlberg

    Teaching Genealogy by Arlene H. Eakle

    Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians by Elizabeth Shown Mills (expensive)

  5. Re: Genealogy Workbook by Diane Dieterle
    For the beginning genealogist this is an excellent source.

    Trained in genealogy by the Morman Church, professional genealogist Diane Dieterle’s publications are thoroughly researched, well thought-out and logically organized.

    DiAnn Wheeler
    Family genealogist, and a former president of
    Friends of the National Archives,Southeast Region

  6. DiAnn Wheeler suggested a book by Diane Dieterle as a good one. I wonder if she is refering to
    _Successful Genealogy_ by Diane Dieterle. I saw this book described as followes, “The beginner’s text for genealogists that you have been waiting for! Gives tried and true methods for success in genealogical research in a fun, easy-to-follow format. Includes master forms and a plan for keeping your work in order.” This book was published in 1995 by American enealogy Lending Library (now defunct I think) and contained 150 pages.

    Perhaps someone could comment on how practical it would be for those whose ancestry is not American like the children of immigrants from Canada, europe or Asia. I personally think that is a key factor in identifying a good book for classroom use– because we get all kinds of wonderfully different people in a typical class, including Samoans, Poles and Chileans.
    Books that dwell on American records, or Italian records may not be suitable. Books thst focus on methodology and use a variey of records from a number of countries to illustrate or teach, would seem to be more veratile.

    For example, a Danish census, and Irish census and an American cenus alike need to have the info therein corroberated from other independent sources. Using clues from a census to lead one to household and family data from vital/ civil records of birth, marriage and death is a fairly universal strategy. Would it not be better to focus on the method, and vary the nationality of the records used in a classroom text? What do you think

  7. My SUCCESSFUL GENEALOGY book has been rewritten and published in 2006 as SUCCESSFUL GENEALOGY FOR EVERYONE.
    Email me at jackdiet@msn.com if you want one. Price: $20.00

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