Monthly Archives: February 2006

Thoughts on Self-directed Learning #4

Ken looks right.jpg

When I was a teacher of English back in the olden days when we first came off the ark, there was a reading for comprehension strategy called SQ3R. In recent years its benefitted from inflation and is known as PSQ5R

Much of how we learn in self directed learning will be dependent on our reading skills. Here is one strategy for reading to comprehend that may be useful to you.

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Pedigree Problems: learning activities

2GalGuy.jpg
Hey, don’t we all have “pedigree problems”? Mine stem from the fact that every single ancestor has two parents. Karen Clifford  used the phrase in her book Becoming an Accredited Genealogist (Orem, UT: Ancestry, 1998) to refer to simple case problems for students of genealogy.

Karen is a clever and talented teacher. I recall her giving a lecture back in 1997 on new CD-ROM databases for genealogists. The connection from her laptop to the projector was non-functional, and while the resident techies at the conference tried to sort out the problem she bravely carried on, joking as she did so. A class act indeed. But lets return to her pedigree problems.

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Thoughts on Self-directed Learning #3

Ken Aitken profile
I like John P Colletta. He teaches with humor, and thats a good thing. At the National Genealogical Society Society Conference in Sacramento in 2004 he gave a lecture called “Resolving Research Dilemmas, Case Studies in Logical Analysis and Successful Methodology”. I wish I had been there. But I have a copy of the syllabus for that conference which I reviewed carefully as part of my own self-directed learning. Its an easy one-page outline, with a powerful message for self directed study. In the outline he provides an interesting study outline. John suggests: Continue reading

Thoughts on Self-directed Learning #2

Ken looks right.jpg

My great grandfather Alfred Webb Hambrook was a timber faller and riverman on one of the tributaties of the Miramichi River of New Brunswick. His nephews, sons and grandsons and grandnephews in the west followed similar pursuits as fallers or rivermen. Fallers learn early in their career a great principle of productivity.

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Thoughts on Self-Directed Learning #1

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Have you noticed that most how to books in genealogy, and most local genealogy classes and workshops seem to focus on genealogy records and seldom address evidence analysis or research logic? So who is the genealogist going to turn to to learn about these things. Certainly not Ghost Busters! As analytical thinking, the logical combination of evidence and the successful construction of genealogical proof have become as important as the acquition of records, we need to look at some new avenues for learning.

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Sharpening the Saw: “Putting Skills to Work”

I always enjoy attending the large national conferences because I get to see some of the best genealogy educators in action. At the National Genealogical Society Conference 6-10 June 2006, for example, you can observe great educators teaching a wonderful array of topics. When you go, do not get so wrapped up in the subjct that you fail to observehow the presenter does his/her job. Study the graphics of their overheads or powerpoint presentations. Look carefully at the match between handout and presentation.

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How to use the Speaker Evaluation Form.

How can you use the speaker evaluation form to get more testimonials you as a speaker and of your programs? Many speakers use their own speaker / program evaluation form to get feedback on their performance in order to improve their presentations. Thats a good idea. Write your own. Select your own questions. Here’s an idea for a couple of questions:

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