Monthly Archives: April 2006

Programs Using Videos: Public Performance Rights

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Discussions among professional genealogists got hot and heavy recently when someone involved in planning programs for a local genealogy idea wondered about the appropriateness of playing a recorded lecture delivered at a major regional conference. During the discussion someone mentioned "public performance rights" which is the right to play an audio or video recording of a performance (a lecture, for example). Most audio recordings of genealogy lectures I've encountered are restricted to personal use by the purchaser. But I have come across a publisher of video presentations for genealogists who generously offers public performance rights to purchasers. This means your local genealogical society can use these videos as part of their program offerings. Want to know more?

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What is Legal and What is Right?

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A couple of days ago someone asked a group I was in about a brilliant idea she had. Apparently she had purchased, or was going to purchase a recording of a lecture given by an outstanding genealogy lecturer, and had the bright idea that she could play this recording in full to her local genealogy group as part of a program. She wanted to know if there was a problem with this.

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Podcast Your Lectures: Another Revenue Stream for Speakers

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I was thinking just the other day when reviewing my topics selected for an upcoming conference that they had chosen one of my old favourite lectures, and I wondered if it could be recorded and sold. An audio version seemed to be insufficient. I wanted my powerpoint to go with it, but being of small brain could not see how to do this. Then I heard about Profcast.

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Teaching about Evidence

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Thomas W Jones wrote an important article entitled. "A Conceptual Model of Genealogical Evidence: Linkage between Present Day sources and Past Facts" that appeared in National Genealogical Society Quarterly 86 (March 1998) pages 5-18. I think I must have read it four or five times trying to get my head in gear. In the end I concluded that evidence was the product of the interaction between the researcher and the information before him. Before there is evidence there must be the resercher's question. Let me explain.

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Teaching about Information

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Donn Devine teaches us about information in his article, "Evidence Analysis" in Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers and Librarians, (Genealogical Publishing Co., 2001) page 333. He says, "Any source or record may contain information based on both primary and secondary knowledge – one of many reasons that genealogists must distinguish between the source and the information it offers" So what is the difference between primary and secondary information?

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What’s in your Media Kit?

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I've been thinking about my dreadful media kit since I wrote Man Bites Dog a while ago.  So I started looking for some advice on building my media kit. It was an eye opener.  May I suggest you check out these two sources to start with. 

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Teaching about Sources

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A source, sometimes referred to as a document or a record, is the "container" so to speak of genealogical information. Historians refer to sources as being primary or secondary. Genealogists see the fallacy of describing a source this way because it is the information that is primarry or secondary. The legal profession describes sources as being original or derivative, a much more practical approach. Genealogists prefer this finer distinction. Lets look more closely.

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