Monthly Archives: October 2006

Apprentice Adventures #8

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This week we are looking at another article. My apprentice has been reading and re-reading Kay Germain Ingalls great article, “Cherchez la femme! Looking for Female Ancestors” in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly Vol.88, No. 3 (Sept 2000) pp. 165-176. Her assignment was to create questions to be used either in a discussion group, or in multiple choice form for use in a test, or on-line course situation. The task of creating questions causes the reader to read a little closer. Continue reading

Apprentice Adventures #7

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My apprentice was over on Thursday and we discussed her assignments. First we discussed her reading of Christine Rose’s book, Genealogical Proof Standard, Building a Solid Case (CR Publications, 2005).

This was excellant preparation for the other reading, Connie Lenzen’s article, “Heritage Books and Family Lore: A Jackson Test in Missouri and Idaho.”National Genealogical Society Quarterly Vol. 86, No. 1 (March 1998) pp.19-36. My instructions were to read the article four times very carefully. The day before our meeting she emailed, “Now I know why you said read it over 4 times! In the past, when I got to stuff like this I just put down conflicting information and bypassed it. Now I now what to do” Continue reading

Workbooks: Another Look at a Useful Tool

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A good workbook can reinforce or expand on your lessons, workshops or lectures by reviewing and expanding on concepts you introduce in your aural presentation. It does this by asking each learner personally to respond to your questions. Lets explore this a bit. Continue reading

Thinking in New Paradigms: Course Corrections

picture-130.jpgI’d like to blame Dean Hunter, Past President of the Federation of Genealogical Societies for planting the doubts that led to changes in my thinking, but to be honest, the doubt was percolating on the back burners of my mind for some time. It was at the National Genealogical Society conference in Milwaukee in 2002. Dean and I shared a room. One evening he told me about a conversation with his friend David Rencher, about what they were taught in their beginning genealogy classes. We were on our way to dinner with David in a great seafood restaurant. “What were you taught?” David and Dean asked. Continue reading

A Media Release Without Usual Media

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When I was a young man about town, in my rock and roll days, promoting rock concert the success of press releases I’d written was determined by how many journalists deemed the releases worthy of their time and attention. And though I knew thed editors of both newspaers, and radio station managers and djs, they often had no time for my media releases Continue reading

Negotiating Speaking Fees: The Speakers View

 

picture-130.jpgman-teaching.jpgRecently, on the Genealogical Speakers Guild list I posed some questions about speakers fees. I was curious about how flexible speakers were on their fees, knowing that a good one hour lecture represents and investment of 50 hours work -time that could be used serving paying clients. And thus a four lecture seminar means a 200 hour investment. At $25 per hour thats a $5000 investment. Speakers were asked if they would barter for part of the fee. I was surprised at the large number of respondants who reduced fees, and how few mentioned bartering for some of the fee. But its the desenters, the speakers who would not budge on fees that made most sense to me. Continue reading

A Self-directed Learning Technique

Ken profile.jpg When I was younger I was proud of the fact that I never let school interfere with my education. Libraries would entice me from classrooms for hours of self directed learning and I immersed myself in arcane studies like solar energy, ancient Roman Britain, World War 2 history, railroad history and expansion, history of photography, etc. No time really for calculus or physics, the libraries called. I was once locked in a research library in Saudi Arabia after closing, totally absorbed in research. But its was in the Social Sciences Library at the University of British Columbia where I learned to follow citations- the backtrail of ideas. Let me explain Continue reading