Category Archives: Self-Directed Learning

Models for Building Web-based Instruction

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While researching “learning dyads” I found this interesting paper on approaches to on-line course design. Click here if you are curious enough to read an academic paper. What do you think?

Apprentice Adventures #8

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This week we are looking at another article. My apprentice has been reading and re-reading Kay Germain Ingalls great article, “Cherchez la femme! Looking for Female Ancestors” in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly Vol.88, No. 3 (Sept 2000) pp. 165-176. Her assignment was to create questions to be used either in a discussion group, or in multiple choice form for use in a test, or on-line course situation. The task of creating questions causes the reader to read a little closer. Continue reading

Workbooks: Another Look at a Useful Tool

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A good workbook can reinforce or expand on your lessons, workshops or lectures by reviewing and expanding on concepts you introduce in your aural presentation. It does this by asking each learner personally to respond to your questions. Lets explore this a bit. Continue reading

A Self-directed Learning Technique

Ken profile.jpg When I was younger I was proud of the fact that I never let school interfere with my education. Libraries would entice me from classrooms for hours of self directed learning and I immersed myself in arcane studies like solar energy, ancient Roman Britain, World War 2 history, railroad history and expansion, history of photography, etc. No time really for calculus or physics, the libraries called. I was once locked in a research library in Saudi Arabia after closing, totally absorbed in research. But its was in the Social Sciences Library at the University of British Columbia where I learned to follow citations- the backtrail of ideas. Let me explain Continue reading

Lunch with Ken: Networking over Onion Soup

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Before moving to my present home I initiated an interesting networking opportunity at a restaurant across from the public library. Every month I would send out an e-mail invitation to the city archivist, a couple of librarians, a half dozen professional genealogists, a podiatrist, and a couple of lawyers to join me for lunch. No one knew for sure but me who was coming. Sometimes just three of us, sometimes a dozen. But the result was generally an opportunity to network between professionals with an interest in records and genealogy. The event was  dutch treat. The conversation was lively and interesting. And very educational. Here we are at a costumed event, in the courtyard. The waitresses wearing parlour maids outfits and caps, astpu would guess, felt the caps were demeaning. Self-directed learning at its best with onion soup, garlic bread, and a group discussion topic.picture-067.jpg

Apprentice Adventures #6

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Spent almost three hours with the apprentice on Wednesday. She’s really pumped up from her reading and studies. She’s been finishing an excellent course, “Researching in the Family history Center” developed by Dr. Penny Christensen for the National Institute for Genealogical Studies and has come back every day excited by new discoveries. And while this was great, she was excited to tell me about reading Helen F.M. Leary’s “Problem Analyses and Research Plans” chapter 14 in Elizabeth Shown Mills, Professional Genealogy: A manual for researchers, writers, editors, lecturers and librarians. (Genealogical Publishing, 2001) .  Let me tell you a bit about what she experienced.

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Seminar Announcer: Leads to Free Learning Opportunities

This photo of my grandparents with my Mom on granddad’s knee is a reminder of their educational philosophy. Granddad was a curious, pragmatic rancher. Grandma grew up in a home in England where indepenent learning was prized. They taught Mom a very croppedgertrudestevenwinifred.jpg

pragmatic approach to independent learning. Which brings me to this post. How would you like to get weekly announcements of audio lectures, many of them free that could help you improve your genealogy business. Check out Seminar Announcer
http://www.SeminarAnnouncer.com

What do you think?