Category Archives: Speakers

Prime the Pump

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Here’s a piece of advice for genealogy speakers that may surpise you. When you find a column, article, or blog in an area similar to your expertise, you should write to the author and compliment them. one speaker reports that she begun doing this in earnest and was astounded at the results. The key, apparently, is to sincerely compliment them on something they’ve said, and offer to be a resource for them. However, you need to remain humble. Don’t promote yourself, your book, Web site or blog. Continue reading

More Reasons to Blog about Your Speaking Engagements

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Here are a few more reasons for you to write a glowing review of every lecture or workshop you deliver.

Content generation. By making notes about each speech and recording them on your blog, you are managing your content for future speeches and books. One speaker told me, “I can’t tell you how many times I referred back to old post-speech blog postings to help me with a current project.” I find that intriguing .

Attract new customers. When people read about how you helped a certain genealogy or historical organization, they’re going to say, “Hmmm…I wonder if he could do that for my group? Maybe I should give him a call…” And you’d better believe getting folks to call you about speaking is a whole lot better than making a cold call.

Customer service. By blogging about your speech, the venue, the client and the audience, you compliment your customer. think about that for a moment. Be sure to email your meeting planner contact and invite him/her to read the glowing post. And be sure to link to the host’s web site. It’s the best thank-you note in the world.

Credibility and celebrity. Blogging your lectures results in more credibility for you as a speaker, and enhanced celebrity status when you incorporate all these blogging ideas, especially if other blogs/Web sites link to your post.

So what do you think? I think I need more of these links back to my clients!

 

 

Ryan Taylor: Gentleman, Scholar and Friend

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Last Sunday my friend Ronald “Ryan’ Taylor left his Toronto hotel and was not seen by his friends agani. It is believed that the body pulled from the Niagara river on the US side is Ryan. I learned the news on monday, tuesday and wednesday from Ryan’s friends across the continent. I was devasted again each day. Ryan was my friend. Continue reading

Tips for Program Planners from my Experiences

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If you are involved in doing program and event planning for your local , regional or other genealogical society, you might benefit from the speaker’s experiences that follow. I invite you to read and take note.

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Teaching Genealogical Society Management Skills

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A month or so ago I was talking with a member of a local genealogical society in the west about a society management issue. She mentioned that at their annual leadership retreat ( an all day Saturday event) they analyzed the past and planned the future of the society. She mentioned having a speaker come in and talk about an issue like membership, programming, newletters, public relations, fund raising etc. I was impressed. During the day the worked as a group and as pairs or trios on various plans. Then at the annual meeting the published their plans etc. a great idea.

Now my friend Jana Broglin, VP of the Federation of Genealogical Societies is looking for speakers to help such groups. If you can speak to a society on some aspect of society management, Jana wants to here from you.

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Recordings of Lectures at FGS Boston

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Sharon Sergeant, the innovative genealogy educator at ancestralmanor.com
sent along the following message recently concerning recorded lectures at FGS Boston. These lecure recordings, when combined with the syllabus material make a very practical package for self directed learners. interested? Read on.

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Do You Need a Virtual Advisory Board?

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Often in the business of genealogy education we need to consult with people to improve our performance, our offerings and our services. some people recommend forming a collegial mastermind group of peers doing similar work to exchange ideas and motivate. While collegial mastermind groups can have a tremendous impact on our genealogy education business, we might also consider forming a Virtual Advisory Board (VAB) with clients from our target market. Here’s how it might work:

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