Return of the Genealogist in Residence

Ken Aitken profile

The Genealogist in Residence idea can also be used as a promotion tool by a speaker. Consider this scenario

Amy was planning to bring her one-woman all-day genealogy evidence analysis seminar to the city where her sister lived, in three months. She was going to go a few days early and visit her sister and family. She was trying to figure out how she was going to afford buying icecream sundaes every day for her favorite nephew Randall. And she was looking for ways to increase awareness of her seminar. While reading the latest postings on that new Genealogy Education blog, she began thinking about the genealogist in residence idea. She called the local library and spoke with the public services librarian. They worked out a deal. Two days before the seminar became “Genealogist in Residence” day at the central library. The library set up a special book display, created a “pathfinder” ( a bibliography on searching for materials on a particular subject) for genealogy. They advertised this consultation opportunity with their free programs. A library clerk took the bookings and directed people to Amy’s work area in a quiet corner of the library. And on the appointed day Amy worked with three people per hour, 15-20 minutes each, for about 6 hours.
She referred people to local library resources as appropriate After each consultation she gave each a personal invitation to attend her seminar. Midday she had lunch with some library workers and at the end of the day in the librarian’s office she reported on the process to the public service librarian and was given a modest honorarium of $50. Was it worth it? You tell me!

At the seminar she had twelveĀ  more excited genealogists than anticipated. And within the year, five had contracted with Amy to do some research for them.
As for Randall, his favorite Aunt took him twice to Dairy Queen for banana splits, then hired a sitter for him and took her sister out for lunch!
The moral. You’ve got to prime the pump. You must have faith and believe.

And I slyly slipped in a short case history into this posting.

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